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Full text of "Dan Dare's Eagle Magazine: First 10 Issues published in 1950"

NATIONAL STRIP CARTOON! WEEKLY 




. EE ■ I'M JUST' 

MEfleS A (UMPLBTEtV \ SBNSI RV1MO 

new AND utJEKPUORCD \ MY SISEN6TH 

PLANET , AND ALL YOU 

ro IS dO TO $£ E P 




?Ju> 44cU*eHf**toe4 of P.C.49 



FROM THE FAMOUS RADIO 

series by ALAN STRANK5 




PJLOT ACA/NST fW£ WOXLD 



by Chad Varab 




The story so far 




Chapter 10 

"Will you come into my 
Parlour?" 



DESIRABLE modem 
my foal!" snorted Geoff, as be 
scrutinised Ihc gloomy, rambling 
old house the Vicar was pointing 
at. "It looks ready to fall down any moment!" 
"What do wc do now?" broke in Ken 
impatiently. "Do we rush the place, or sneak 
up on it? And have you a gun, in case Gog 

Geoff laughed. 

"I don't know where you get your ideas of 
Secret Service work, laddie," be said. "We're 
not going to arrest Gog, or engage in gun- 
play, if I can help it. I wouldn't have brought 
a kid like you if I were'" 

"Not going to arrest him?" Ken looked 
horrified. "But he he's a dirty traitor!" 

"So tlific's message alleged, if I decoded it 
correctly," said the Vicar. "But we've no 
proof of it, yet." 

"And if we rush in without thinking," con- 
tributed Geoff, "we shall probably not get 
the proof we want-" 



U felled Mm as neatly as if he'd been pale-axed 



"It would be 'andy if wc could get 'im to 
lead us to some of 'is mates afore e suspects 
as we're on 'is track," suggested Dick, speak- 
ing in his usual deliberate way. 

"Thai's the idea," said Geoff, looking at 
Dick shrewdly, as if he were noticing him for 
(be first time. "Now, here are your orders. 
You, Dick, wUI cruise unobtrusively about 
in the neighbourhood, keeping your eyes 
open, and never getting too far away in case 
any of us needs to be picked up in a hurry. 
Use your own discretion - after your last 
remark i'm sure you've got plenty." Dick 
coloured slightly, but his stolid northern (ate 
betrayed no other sign of pleasure at this 
word of praise. "You, Bill, will call on Gog, 
announcing yourself as "the Vicar'. He won't 
think to ask whether it's this parish that 
you're the Vicar of. and you can keep hint 
talking about anything you like to use as an 
excuse for your call. A subscription to your 
Organ Fund, or something." 

"We haven't an Organ Fund," objected 
'Burglar Bill', "and I reseat the suggestion 
that if I call on anyone it's most likely to be 
a begging expedition!' 

"Well, think of something bettor if you 
can," retorted Geoff. "The mail] thing is, to 
keep him talking whilst 1 snoop around and 
see if He's got Ted Iliffe imprisoned there. If 
you can get anything incriminating out of 
Gog, so much the better, but whatever you 
do, don't arouse his suspicions." 

"What about me?" asked Ken glumly, 
thinking he was going to be left out. "Can't 
I come with you, Mr. Geoff?" 

"I'd nearly forgotten you, sonny," said the 
Secret Service man, getting out of the car. 
"No, you go with the Vicar. He can truth- 
fully introduce you as 'one of my boys' 
you're in his Club, aren't you? - and Gog 
will probably assume you're his son." 
. "Heaven forbid!" exclaimed the Vicar. 

Dick chuckled and drove off. When Ken 
turned back from waving to him, Geoff had 
vanished and the Vicar was already striding 
along the drive. Ken ran and caught him 
up. 

The Vicar pressed his thumb firmly on the 
door -bell. A shifty-eyed manservant opened 
the door a few inches and looked at them 
suspiciously through the crack. 

"What do you want?" he askerL 

The Rev. BUI Read pushed the door 
further open. 



"Don't peer at me as if I were a tramp, my 
man!" he boomed. "And do you usually 
address callers in that uncivil way?" 

The man looked as if he would have liked 
to say something rude if the clergyman had 
looked less like a prize-fighter. 

"Kindly tell Professor Gog Ihc Vicar is 
calling upon him." 

"He's not in," said the man; then, as 
"Burglar Bill's" jaw stuck out pugnaciously, 
he added reluctantly, "sir". 

"Nonsense! I know he's in, so you're cither 
lying or mistaken. I'll give you the benefit of 
the doubt, and assume the latter." 

"Well, I'll go and sec, but if he is, he'll be 
loo busy to see you sir," answered the 
fellow uneasily. He tried to shut the door, but 
the visitor's number ten shoe was in the way, 
so he retreated, glancing back murderously 
over his shoulder. 

"How'm I doing T' asked the Vicar out of 
the turner of his mouth. 

"Fine, sir!" enthused Ken. "1 think we'll 
get in." 

The "gaolbird" returned. 

"The professor is very busy, sir, but he says 
be will spare you one minute if you'll wait a 
moment," he said. He made no move to 
admit them, so the Vicar strode purposefully 
in with Ken at his heels. 

"We'll wait in the drawing-room," he 
announced firmly. "You've kept us on the 
doorstep too long as it is." 

The man looked as if he were about to 
argue the point, then shrugged his shoulders 
and led the way to a room that was beauti- 
fully furnished but didn't look as if it was 
used much. 

"You needn't wak," snapped the Vicar. 

The servant looked daggers, but went. The 
Vicar jerked his head at Ken, and the boy 
stood by the door with his ear dose to it 
whilst his companion tried the drawers of 
the desk. They were all locked, but the Vicar 
plucked off the top slwet of the blotter and 
crammed it into his pocket. 

"Ssst!" hissed Ken, moving away from the 
door. When the Professor entered, they were 
both apparently absorbed in an oil painting 
so dark that no one could tell if it was a 
family portrait or two cows. 

The Professor was obliging enough to look 
exactly like Ken's idea of a Professor. He had 
grey rumpled hair hedging in a shiny bald 
pate, a walrus moustache, yesterday's egg on 



his waistcoat, semicircular teases to his 
glasses, and a preoccupied expression. 

"My dear fellow P boomed the Vicar 
genially, advancing with outstretched hand. 
He had a grip like a bear, and the Professor 
winced. "How delightful to see you again! It 
has been a long time, hasn't it?" 

"No flies on Burglar Bill!" thought Ken. 
"Gog can't be sure they haven't met before, 
and he'll have a job to find out without 
appearing rude!" 

"Yes - yes, indeed!" stammered the Pro- 
fessor uncertainly. He looked wildly round, 
noticed Ken, and addressed him with relief. 
"Ha, my boy! I haven't' met job before, have 
I ? What's your name ?" 

"Ken, sir." 

If the Professor, assuming they were father 
and sort, had hoped for a mention uf the 
surname of his unwelcome visitors he was 
disappointed. 

"Well, Mr. - cr - cr - well. Vicar, what can 
1 do for you?" 

The Vicar obtained somewhat grudging 
permission to sit down and light his pipe, and 
launched info a long and involved account of 
the difficulties of running young people's 
dubs, the shakiness of much Church finance, 
the problems of juvenile delinquency, and 
many kindred mailers. He approached the 
sdhject of a "small subscription " from 
several different angles, but sheered off every 
time his victim reached for his cheque-book 
and tried to pin him down in a definite 
amount or to discover to whom or what the 
cheque should be made payable. Ken could 
almost feel sorry for the Professor, who was 
hopping about from one leg to the other in 
his impatience to gel rid of his callers, and 
trying in vain to get a word in edgeways. 
"Burglar Bill" was nutting up a marvellous 
performance, pretending to be hard of hearing 
and booming away non-slop. When Ken 
slipped to the door muttering something 
about going to the lavatory, the Professor 
was too distraught to nonce, though the 
Vicar looked up with a warning frown. 



ONCi- outside the door. Ken listened intently 
for any sign of the footman's presence, 
and (hen dodged up the stairs. The lavatory 
door was open, so he shut it in case he 
shuuld have to pretend that he couldn't find 
the place. He passed swiftly along the 
corridor, trying doors cautiously until he 
came to one that was locked. He lapped 
gently on this one, saying with breathless 
politeness, "Are you going to be in there 
much longer?" so that if anyone but Ted 
lliffe were in he could claim that he had mis- 
understood the nature of the room. However, 
there was no reply, and when he applied his 
eye to the keyhole he caught a glimpse of 
what appeared to be electrical apparatus. 

He was just about to open a green baize 
door when he heard footsteps from the other 
side of it, and had to nip into the nearest un- 
locked room He closed the door behind htm 
a fraction of a second before the other door 
slammed gently on its spring, and waited, 
scarcely breathing, for the footsteps to pass. 
They did pass, for a few paces - (hen they 
returned, and he pressed himself against the 
wall as the door opened. 

'"Come on out ot it!" growled a voice 
which he recognised as tlvat of the uncouth 



Ken was too paralysed to move. His 
stomach seemed to turn over and he clenched 
his fists. 

The voice spoke again, cajoltngly this time. 
"Come on, now! 1 shan't hurt you!" 

There was something more frightening (o 
Ken in this coaxing than in the previous 
angry tone. He found himself thinking "Will 
you walk into my parlour? said the spider to 
the fly". Then the voice continued, mote in- 
sistently, "Chi-clu-chi-chi-chi!"and it was all 
Ken could do to stop himself letting out his 
breath with relief. There was a plaintive 
"miaou w!" and a tiny thump as the cat 
jumped off the bed, and Ken caught a glimpse 
of the back of the footman's head as he bent 
to pick up a huge marmalade cat by the scruff 
of its neck. Then the door was closed and the 
footsteps receded. 

He gave a little hysterical giggle, then 



checked himself. He found himself tremb ling. 
and sat on the bed to recover. Rut knowing 
thai the Vicar might not be able to keep Gog 
talking much longer, he soon made for the 
green baize door and tiptoed up the stairs 
which ii concealed. 

There was no doubl which of the allies wax 
Ihe scientist's prison. One of the doors was 
reinforced, and had a grille in it so that food 
could be passed through without the gaoler 
entering. Ken pulled back the bolt securing 
the grille, and opened the panel. 

The man sitting on the pallet-bed in the cell 
didn't trouble to look up, until Ken whis- ' 
pered hoarsely, "Are you Ted fJiffe?" Then 
the man leapt to his feet and came across to 
the grille. 

"Who are you?" he demanded. 

"My name's Ken. My pal Jim found you 
in that cellar, but when Dick and my sister 
and I went for you, you'd gone." 

"Yes, they came back for me within about 
ten minutes of Jim going for help. I'm glad 
they didn't catch him. How did you get here? 
Are you alone?" 

"No - I came with Dick and the Vicar and 
his friend Geoff from M.I.5. Dick's still in 
the car, the Vicar's keeping Gog talking, and 
Mr. Geoff's looking for you." 

The prisoner looked suddenly wary. 

"Can you get me out without Geoff's 
help? Where is he?" 

"I don't know," answered Ken to both 
questions. '"Will that footman he coming 
back?" 

"I expect so - my lummy says it's lime for 
lunch. Can you pick a lock?" 

"I shouldn't think so - I never have, except 
on my suitcase once when I lost the key." 

"Well, try with this," said Dr. Ililfe, hand 
ing a piece of metal through the grille. 

"Can'l you do it from your side?" asked 
Ken dubiously. 

"No keyhole, and I've nothing to cut 
through with. Hurry, man?" 

Under Ihe direction of the imprisoned 
scientist. Ken twisted the bent metal in the 
lock, but although it would turn in several pos- 
it tons, It would noi lift all the wards at once. 

"Give me it back a minute!" 

Dr. Ililfe wrested with the implement for 



some lime oui of Ken's line of vision. Ken 
tried the other I wo doors on this landing, but 
they were locked. There was nowhere to hide 
if the manservant should return. 

The prisoner passed the pick-lock back. 
Ken was still wrestling frantically with it 
when he heard the rattle of crockery ap- 
proaching the baize door. 



The sudden appearance or the man with the 
torn my -gun was like a cold douche lo Ray, 
Anna. Jim and I'm. in their moment of exal- 
lalion. Apart from whirling to face him, they 
stood in frozen immobility, like statues. It 
was Pru who broke the spell. 

"Why, Mr. Cosh," she exclaimed, "what- 
ever are you doing here?" 

Ray slapped his thigh disgustedly. 

"Of course!" he said. "Albert Cosh! I 
knew I'd s 
place you. 
galley?" 

The man's beady little eyes gleamed with 

"So you recognise me now, do you? All 
the more reason lo see you never gel out of 
here alive! Now stick 'em up and lurn 

"Take no notice of him!" commanded 
Anna, scornfully. Jim guiltily lowered his 
hands again, and glanced at Pru lo see if 
she'd noticed his action. "Like all bullies, he's 
a coward! Go on, shoot, if you dare - that 
thick neck of yours would just suit a hang- 
man's halter!" 

" Don't you try me too far '." snarled the man. 
"Do as you're told, and don't Iry any tricks, 
or I might do something you'd be sorry for!" 

"You might panic and do something you'd 
be sorry for," admitted Anna. 

So saying, she began to walk deliberately 
towards him, her eyes on his. Ray needed no 
clearer hint lo approach him too. 

"Get back, you fools!" shrieked Cosh. 

The advancing pair neither faltered nor 
hastened. Cosh backed away until he bumped 
into the porch. Then, with his back against 
the wall, he closed his eyes and was about lo 
blaze away wildly when something crashed 
on his head and knocked the weapon from his 




The first burst wrecked ihe front tyre 



grasp. Jim had pushed the ladder over and it had 
felled him as neatly as if he'd been pole-axed. 

Ray lifted the ladder with his one good 
hand, and Anna snatched up the tommy-gun 
which had been trapped under ii. 

"Let's get out of here!" suggested Jim 
anxiously. 

They all made their way as quickly as 
possible to the place where Pru had climbed 
Ihe wall. There was no sign of pursuit. 

Infuriatlngly, there seemed to be no traffic 
at all just when they wanted to thumb a lift. 
They walked on, one of them looking back 
frequently for signs of a hue and cry. They 
had walked about a quarter of a mile when 
Jim yelled: "Car just driven out of Figtree's 
gate !" They dashed for a five-barred gate into 
a field, and were climbing over it, when Pru, 
who had been giving Ray a leg-up, suddenly 
rushed back into the middle of Ihe road, 
yelling and waving. As the others saw the 
reason they clambered back, too, A taxi was 
approaching at iis top speed of about forty 
miles an hour. 



It pulled up alongside them, and they all 
piled in on top of Dr. Briggs, Jim darting 
round to the other door to save lime. "Turn, 
driver - that car's after us, and they're 
armed !" yelled Ray. 

"Blimey!" moaned the cabby, fumbling 
agitatedly with his gears. "If- 1 ever get ant 
o' this alive . . ," 

He had the cab sprawled right across the 
road as the other car approached at speed. 
The pursuers pulled up with a shriek of 
brakes, but by the time they had leapt oul, 
the cab was off, and they had to get in again. 

The brief start they had was being rapidly 
reduced by the faster car when Dr. Briggs 
said, very politely for him, "Excuse me, 
young lady", and took Ihe tommy-gun from 
Anna, who seemed to have forgotten she 
still had it, and leaned out of the window. 
There was a noisy stuttering sound, and Jim 
yelled "Gol 'emT" 

The Doctor's first burst had wrecked both 
the front tyres of the pursuing car. which was 
now bumping along almost out of control. 
As it stopped, a man sprang out and fired at 
the retreating taxi, but Ihe only tyre he hit was 
the spare one, and the cab was soon out of 
range, 

"Don't you ever try to 'ire my cab again, 
any of you," shouted the terrified driver, 
swerving dangerously as he turned lo glare 
at his passengers. "1 shall want double fare, 
and damages, that I shall. You did oughter 'a 
knowed better. Dr. Briggs." 

The Doctor ignored him. He was sitting 
back between Jim and Pru, with a beatific 
smile on his face. 

"I'm a man of peace," he remarked 
dreamily. "A respectable citizen pursuing an 
honourable calling. I've been deprived of my 
car, I've had my taxi snaffled under my very 
nose by a young hussy who wants a good 
spanking, and I've been left on the fringe of 
all the excitement of the last sixteen hours or 
so, and / don't mind- It's all been worth it." 

"I'm glad to bear you say that. Doctor," 
said Ray grimly, "because if thai 'plane isn't 
going to machine-gun us, I'll send back my 
D.F.C " 

To be continued next week 



sm 



Roosevelt Commemorative 

and WONDERFUL STAMP 




COLLECTION 



/ 



ree 



Containing SAN MARINO 
large multi-coloured stamp 
depicting President Roose- 
velt; FRENCH MOROCCO mint pictorial; large 
GREECE "Leaping Bull" issued before the war; 
grand CHINA Airmail showing Aeroplane over the 
Great Wall; JUGOSLAVIA King Alexander as 
Prince; 3 BELGIUM axaunemontins (Ostend- 
Dover mail boat. Woman making lace, and An- 
tarctic Expedition); set of 3 HINDENBURG; set 
of 4 HUNGARY famous men; ROD MANIA 1922 
Coronation 50 bani ; and finally a large 1946 stamp of FRANCE 20 Frames with a 
fine view of Pointc du Raz. this stamp alone is catalogued I0rL These 17 scarce 
stamps will be sent ABSOLUTELY FREE to every collector who asks to 
SEE a selection of our Famous Approvals. (Enclose 2jd.) 



PHILATELIC SERVICES, 



HULL 



. . . and over 1,000 
other orders and decorations. 
Boys like you are needed 
Ihe proud Royal Air Force tradition. 
You'll get a fine technical and general 
and learn a skilled trade. It's 
a grand life — lots of sport — everything 
found- -good food — pocket money. It 
flying career and promotion. 




^V <* RESCUES LOST 




PROFESSOR BRITTAIN EXPLAINS: X-RAY 



MAGftAM OF HOT CAT 


HODE TUBE 

QTH6M j 


A *\/\ y 


HAV9 WERE OifFBAl IfiP 




Any Questions? 

Write lo Professor Brittain, c/o eagle, if you have any questions or problems you would like him to deal with. He will be on this page from time lo time. 



SETH AND SHORTY - COWBOYS 




HEROES OF THE CLOUDS 



SOME IDEA OF 

.YIEWQFA'VAMIwrFtGMTHmyiN&AifiNGSini 




DISCOVERING THE COUNTRYSIDE 



U^/JkMul^h)\ 




IS CH6WED INTO BALLS OF P< 
,V\AKES THE CELLS WHIL1H FORM HER NEST. THE FIRST CELI 
FASTENED TO THE ROOK OF THE COMPARTMENT, TO W 
MOfiE LAYERS HANGING DOWNWAWOS. IN THESE CELLS T 
; ARE LAID, ANP WHEN THE GRUBS MArCH, SHE FEEDS 
INSECTS AND CATERPILLARS. 




HEN THE FlHST VOUNG WASPS COMg 

OM THE CELLS THEY HELP THE QUEFN 8Y 

ILARGlNG THE NEST, BUILDING MORE 

CELLS.AND BRINGING FOOD TO THE NEW 

GRU9S, FOR THE QuEEN NOW STAYS AT 

HGMC AND DEVOTES HER TJME TO LAVING 




THERE IS ANOTHER TYPE OF WASP. THE 

HANGS ITS NEST 
FROM BRANCHES OF BUSHES OR TREES 
THE CELLS ARE ftuILT IN eXACTLY T " 
SAME /WINNER. WITH AN OUTER 
COVERING OF PAPERY * 
THE WOOD l".IVaP 13 SLIGHTLY 

Smaller than the 

COMMON V 




EAGLE CLUB 



AND EDITOR'S PAGE 



The Editor's Office 

EAGLE 
43 Shoe Lane, London, EC -4 

WHAT is Philuminism? It is, 
according to David E. Tut hill 
of Plymouth, the collecting of 
match-box covers. 
That's something we learned from the 
"What do you like best" Competition in 
faou No. 3. (Incidentally there art quite 
a large number of "Philum mists" in the 
eacle Club.) 

Wc were very nearly snowed under, but not 
quite, by all the lists of hobbies you sent 
along, and very interesting lists Ihcy were loo. 
Selecting the one we liked best was a tremen- 
dous job; so much so, that we have decided 
to award three prizes instead of one. 




Freda Austin of? Chant rey Road,, Brixton 
sent in the list for which we are awarding the 
first of the prizes. Her interests apart from 
what we might call the usual hobbies, like 
those we listed on the coupon include 
"Dressing up", '"Doing the Housework", 
"Making Snow-men", "Reading the Bible", 
"Sitting in the Dark". "Going on Bus Rides", 
"Shorthand and Typing", "Nursing", "Dress- 
making", "Watching Weddings". "Baby 
Minding", "Making Noises" and fifty-four 
more. It seemed to us a most varied and 
enterprising lisi. showing a good deal of 
originality. 

Two others we have picked out for prizes 
are Frank L. Tebbs. 136 Lichfield Road, 
Beconttec, whose list includes pisciculture. 
(We are learning a number of new words in 
this competition; I imagine that pisciculture 
means 'care of fish'J. And John Bowers. 21 
Bancroft Road, Newark -on-Trent, who inclu- 
des archery and puppetry among his interests. 

I also think we ought to send five bob io 
David Tuthill for leaching us what philu- 



There are a great many other lists almost 
equally good arid wc have certainly been 
astonished by the wide variety of hobbies and 
interests shown by -EAGLE readers. We are 
going carefully through all (he lists so as to 
get a clear picture of what you like doing 
most. It will be a very great Itclp in planning 
further activities of the Club. It is clear that 
we shall have to organise a good number of 
hobby groups in which all Eaglers wilh similar 
interests can join. So far, you remember, we 
have made a slarl wilh forming the Model 
Car Club. 



This week, we announce our second mug 
tir thf MONTH. You'll agree, we feel sure, 
that it is a thoroughly deserved award. 

Here arc the names of some others who 
have been elected mugs. We shall announce 
others from time to time in later issues as 
space allows. 

There is, for example, 16-ycar-oW John 
Wilkins from Lincoln who has saved two 
people from drowning in a year. He is patrol 
leader of the 22nd Troop of Lincoln Scouts 
and has been awarded, the gilt cross and bar. 

There is Victor Crouch of 103 Galloway 
Road, Shepherd's Bush, London, who one 
day saw iwo boys driving a dog olTaciirfinto 
the sea. He tackled the hoys and got hadly 
hurt. But he kept on and then, although there 
weie glass and stones in the water, he jumped 
in and saved the dog from being washed out 

There is Elizabeth Me Hutchison who came 
across a little girl of three playing on the foot- 
path. The little girl dashed into the road after 
her ball - in the path of an oncoming car. 
Elizabeth ran out and grabbed the little girl 
and got her back to the pavement just in lime. 

There is Roy Davies of 18 Spark Street, 
Birmingham. He has given up many weeks of 
his lime to look after an elderly couple who 
have been ill and had no one tocare for them. 

We have only room for these four examples 

this week. They all seem to us to have done 
something special which deserves the award 
of the Mugs Badge. There are many others 
to tell you about later. 

Yours sincerely, 

THE EDITOR 



M H& OF THE MONTH 



f 



/>'*// 

W:/,, 



ANTHONY PEEL 

Eleven-year-old Anthony Peel of 
Leigh Avenue, Mai pie, Cheshire, 
returned to his home late one night 
soaked to the skin and covered with 
mud. He was spanked and sent to 
bed for ''falling into a pond." 

The true story was not known until 
a little later when Mrs. Dowse called 
at the Peel's and disclosed that 
Anthony was a hero. He had rescued 
her boy Barm- from the 6 ft. deep 
Peak Forest Canal. He had heard 
cries and ran to the canal bank, dived 
in and brought Baine to the side. 



COMPETITION CORNER 

There are prizes for oil cooiptti lions again this Keek. You can tend all 

your entries in one envelope, hut please put your name and address 

and Huh number on each. Address to Competition, EAGLE, 4 Nrw 

Street Square, London, E.C.4. 

1. SEQUELS From the thousands of replies received to the Kilt-In competition 

some weeks ago it is obvious that a great many or you are very keen on drawing. So 

here is something rather more difficult. Our artist has drawn one picture and has left 

the empty square for you to use your imagination and draw the succeeding part, the 

sequel. If you don't want to cut the page trace the blank square on to a piece of paper. 

National Savings Certificates of £1 will be given for the three most original -Sequels'' 

received not later lhan June 21sl. 




2.POPULARITY COMPETITION, N « . 2 Write on a postcard, 
in order numbered 1 to 6, your choice of the six books you have read wiiich you 
enjoyed most. Prizes of a £1 National Savings Certificate will be awarded to those 
wlio give correctly the books in the order of popularity agreed by the judges. 
3. THE NOISES THEY MAKE: You all know that parrots talk and 
monkeys chatter, but do you know the noises made by (a) donkeys, (b) horses, 
(c) lapwings, (d) seagulls, (e) hens, (I") hyena, (g) deer, (h) cricket, (i) grasshopper? 
A prize of a 10/6 National Savings Certificate will go to the sender of the first correct 
solution opened on June 21st. 



CART A IN PUGW ASH 




hash Lonergan's Quest 



By MOORE RAYMOND 



The story so far 




pleaded : "You a 



Chaptei 



Lash froze in his tracks, startler ahead 



MO POKE suddenly stepped out 
from behind (Ik tree. He carried a 
boomerang and spear. Crying 
some native word, he again 
hurled his boomerang. 

Yabbayabba, watching its swift curving 
Right, raised his millanulla in readiness to 
strike the weapon and bring it to the ground. 

Then Mopoke silently flung a spear. It was 
limed to reach Yabbayabba at the same mom- 
ent as the boomerang on its longer Right. 

The trick caught Yabbayabba off his guard. 
He was just about to strike at the boomerang 
when he glimpsed the Hashing spear. He 
hurled himself to the ground just in time. 

So accurate was Mopoke 's judgment that 
the two weapons reached the spot simul- 
taneously. Unluckily, the boomerang hit one 
end of the whizzing spear, and both went 
flying into a dense and thorny waitawhile 
bush. Luckily, they were well out of reach of 
Yabbayabba, now on his feet again. 

"Hard luck, Mopoke!" called Lash, 
straining at the rope around his feet. New 
hope of rescue had given him renewed 
strength, and he thought he could detect a 
loosening of the bonds. 

With a cry Yabbayabba leapt at Mopoke, 
whom he now believed to be unarmed. 

But all the time Mopoke had concealed in 
his left hand a small but deadly weapon. It 
was a smooth, egg-shaped pebble he slipped 
into his right hand. He flung it with all his 
might at the onrushing Yabbayabba. 

The stone struck the black in the middle of 
the forehead. He grunted, spun round, flung 
wide his weapons, and fell flat on his back 



Lash \ 
cramped 

"Mopoke!" he exclaimed, reaching out a 
hand. "Put it there, cobber!" 

Shyly yet proudly, the aborigine clasped 
Lash's brown hand in his huge black paw. 
Then Lash instructed him to mount the horse 
that stood beside Monarch. 

His first thought had been to take Yabba- 
yabba prisoner, march him along to the 
police, and turn him over as a self-confessed 

But he quickly decided that Yabbayabba 
could wail. The black murderer was only an 
ignorant hireling. There were bigger fish to 

'To Opal town," said Lash, urging 
Monarch into an amble. 

"No, no, boss!" cried Mopoke. "Go longu 
father fella. Koala." 

"Your father?" Lash was puzzled. 

Then Mopoke told the story the young man 
was aching to hear - the story of how the 
black managed to arrive in time to save him. 

It was all very simple. Mopoke's father. 
Koala, had sent his son to ask Lash to come 
up into the hills, where he would learn some 
very important news. 

Koala himself did not come down from his 



hiding-place, because he was being hunted by 
Yabbayabba. Koala had been one of the 
blacks who had discovered Uncle Peter's body 
that tragic day. He had seen Yabbayabba 
running away from the scene of the crime. 
He knew too much for Yabbayabba, who 
was out to silence htm. 

But that was not all the news. Koala had 
something extremely important 10 show Lash. 
It was something to do with opals. 

"Could he have made an opal strike?" 
Lash asked him excitedly. 

Mopoke went on to say how be went oil to 
Oonawidgee in search of Lash. 

When he learned from Rawhide O'Reilly 
that Lash had ridden off in pursuit of Dago 
Messiter, the aborigine made for Coolabah 
Creek Station. 

"You runnem all night?" suggested Lash 
admiringly. 

Mopoke chuckled and went on to tell how 
he had arrived at the homestead before dawn. 
Then, when daylight came, he saw Lash being 
put in charge of Yabbayabba and being taken 
off into the bush. 

Speaking in blackfellow English, Lash said: 
"I'll do what your father asks, Mopoke. 
I'm sure it must be very important and 
urgent news. But first I'm going to Opallown. 

"I've got an idea I might find out some- 
thing about The Hunchback in Opallown 
this morning . . . something to do with last 
night's robbery ■ • - something that might 
lead us to his secret headquarters." 

They went cantering off through the scrub 
to the deserted township. 

About half-a-mile from the deserted town- 
ship. Lash and Mopoke reined their horses to 
a walk. This was the roughrider's first pre- 

They had not gone far when Monarch 




whinnied. Both horses pricked their ears. 

"There's a horse ahead," Lash told him- 
self "Maybe more than one. Did a horse 
whinny in Opallown and give warning of our 
approach?" 

The roughrider and his companion dis- 
mounted and tied up their horses. They 
approached Opaltown quietly and on foot. 

"'Wait longa here a bit," he said to Mopoke. 
Standing hidden in the last patch of scrub on 
the outskirts of Opaltown. they gazed down 
(he dusty road that ran through (he tumhle- 
down settlement. 

II was deserted. Not even a snake or goanna 
or frill lizard ran across the sun-scorched 

Yet Lash sensed there was someone about. 
"Mine tinkit fella longa here," he murmured 
to Mopoke. 

Lash made for the mouldering building 
that was once the township's bank. It was 
here he had first discovered the strongbox 
clues that connected The Hunchback with 
Opallown. 

On ncaring the place, he signalled Mopoke 
to move off and try 'o approach the bank 
from the front. The black silently disappeared. 

Crack ! U was the unmistakable sound of a 
breaking twig, snapped by someone's weight 
on the brittle wood. Lash froze in his tracks, 
staring ahead. 

"There's somebody behind that fence," he 
told himself as he crouched low and began to 
inch his way forward. He was acutely aware 
that he might at any moment be confronted 
with the menace known as The Hunchback. 

He crept silently forward till he had almost 
reached the vine-curtained fence. He held his 
breath and listened. 



sheer 500 feel above the hills 



Lash edged further forward and, resting a 
hand on one of the palings, started to 
draw aside the curtain of leaves. 

The paling was rotten, and it gave way. 
The roughrider fell forward on to the fence, 
and the whole thing collapsed. 

As he went sprawling. Lash heard a yell of 
surprise. Before he could disentangle himself 
the muzzle of a rifle was shoved within an 
inch of his nose. "Suck 'em up!" cried a shrill 
voice. "Or I'll drill you!" 

Lash burst into laughter. The holder of the 
gun looked momentarily astonished. Then he 
gave a joyful cry of recognition. 

"Lashr 

"Squib!" 

"Rawhide and I came up lookin' for you," 
said Squib breathlessly. "He's bavin' a squrz 
on that side o' the road and I'm lookin' on 
this. And I'm the one that's found vou!" 

Mopoke appeared as if by magic. He had 
heard the pair's laughter, and came to in- 
vestigate. 

Rawhide heard it, too. He arrived to find 
Lash, Squib, and Mopoke squatting on the 
collapsed fence. 

Mopoke plucked al Lash's sleeve and 



e quick longa Koala fella, 

"Too right, Mopoke. We won't waste any 
more time here. We've already made enough 
noise to scare anybody away. So get your 
horses, mates." 

Soon the four companions were riding 
north towards the hills again. 

Now it was Mopoke who led the group. 
He picked bis way among the basalt boulders, 
winding in and out of the gums, ironbarks, 

Suddenly they came to a clearing bordered 
by wattle trees golden with bloom. 

Mopoke's father. Koala, awaited them. 
The greying tufts of hair on either side of his 
head gave the blackfellow an appearance 
like the bear after which he was named. 

Lash, who had known Koala since child- 
hood, jumped down and shook the old man's 

He briefly repeated what Mopoke had told 
the roughrider - bow lit had seen Yabba- 
yabba running from the scene of Uncle 
Peter's murder, and how a great piece of opal 
was clutched in the lifeless hand of the man 
who was carried by the blacks to the home- 
stead of Coolabah Creek station. 

"Opal !" exclaimed the old aborigine, 
pointing further into the hills. "Plenty opal 
longa bird humpy." 

"What's he mean?" asked Rawhide. "Bird 
humpy. That means bird's house." 

"Why waste time talking about it?" asked 
Lash as he remounted. "Let's go and see." 

With an agile ease surprising in a man of 
his age. Koala vaulted up behind Mopoke, 
who once more rode ahead into the hills. 

The slope grew steeper and stonier. The 
gullies became ravines. Then, suddenly, they 
rode out of the scrub and saw Candle Peak. 

Ages ago, when the crust of the earth in 
these regions was undergoing the convulsions 
of settling down to rest, a deep-down volcanic 
force thrust up a finger of rock. Roughly 
cylindrical in shape, it looked something tike 
the stump of a lighted candle to the explorer 
who saw it with the glow of sunrise at its peak. 

"Bunyip longa there, eh. Koala T' laughed 
Rawhide, pointing to the peak with precipi- 
tous sides I hat rose a sheer 500 feet above the 
boulder-strewn hills. 

Koala did not approve of the joke. Like 
the rest of the blacks, he believed the tradi- 
tional story about the inaccessible peak 
being inhabited by a bunyip. The bunyip is a 
fearsome, fabulous creature of the bush. 

Koala instructed Mopoke to rein their 
horse to a hall. Pointing down to the bottom 
of the ravine, he said; "Findcm Missa 
Lonergan longa there." 

"Then it must be somewhere around here 
he found that bonzer bit of Opal," suggested 
the Irishman. 

"Missa Messiter come longa here with 
plenty fella," went on Mopoke. "All fella 
lookem, lookem, lookem. No findem opal." 

Koala slid off the horse and turned to the 
others with a grin that mingled pride and 
cunning. "This fella findcm budgeree opal," 
he told them. 

So they all dismounted and followed htm 
across the stony slope to a clump of mulga 
trees at the foot of Candle Peak. 

"Ssssh-h-h!" whispered the old black, 
quietly leading the way through the trees. 
Soon he stopped and pointed, muttering: 
"Opal longa bird humpy." 

"It's a bower bird's nest!" exclaimed 
Squib. 

"Not a nest," corrected Lash in a soft 
"A bower bird's playground. They 



As they moved closer to the bower 
fashioned out of tall, dry grass intertwined at 
the top by the bird's weaving beak. Squib 
remembered what he had learned from the 
book . . . how the bird collected pebbles, bits 
of glass, bright things of every description, 
and made little heaps to decorate his bower. 

"Strike me handsome!" exclaimed Raw- 
hide aloud. "Look at the opals!" 

(To be continued) 



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